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Small Gods: A Novel of Discworld

Small Gods: A Novel of Discworld

Current price: $9.99
Publication Date: October 29th, 2013
Publisher:
Harper
ISBN:
9780062237378
Pages:
400
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(SciFi/Fantasy)
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Description

"Humorously entertaining. . . subtly thought-provoking. . . Pratchett's Discworld books are filled with humor and magic." —Chicago Tribune

"Think J.R.R. Tolkien with a sharper, more satiric edge." —Houston Chronicle

The thirteenth novel in the Discworld series from New York Times bestselling author Sir Terry Pratchett.

Lost in the chill deeps of space between the galaxies, it sails on forever, a flat, circular world carried on the back of a giant turtle— Discworld —a land where the unexpected can be expected. Where the strangest things happen to the nicest people. Like Brutha, a simple lad who only wants to tend his melon patch. Until one day he hears the voice of a god calling his name. A small god, to be sure. But bossy as Hell.

Religion is a competitive business in the Discworld. Everyone has their own opinion and their own gods, of every shape and size—all fighting for faith, followers, and a place at the top. So when the great god Om accidentally manifests himself as a lowly tortoise, stripped of all divine power, it’s clear he’s become less important than he realized.

In such instances, you need an acolyte, and fast. Enter Brutha, the Chosen One—or at least the only One available. He wants peace, justice and love—but that’s hard to achieve in a world where religion means power, and corruption reigns supreme.

The Discworld novels can be read in any order but Small Gods is a standalone.

About the Author

Terry Pratchett (1948–2015) was the acclaimed creator of the globally revered Discworld series. In all, he authored more than fifty bestselling books, which have sold more than one hundred million copies worldwide. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal. He was awarded a knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II for his services to literature in 2009, although he always wryly maintained that his greatest service to literature was to avoid writing any.